Five reasons the Conservatives lost seats

Luke Springthorpe, director of Conservative Progress, outlines why he thinks the Conservative Party lost seats in the general election.

1) Brexit became a fig leaf barely concealing the fact that there was virtually nothing there behind it. The manifesto offered nothing to excite anyone about voting Conservative and certainly didn’t offer enough to people who voted to Remain in the referendum.

2) The national campaign stopped talking about how Conservatives would aspire to make people better off or to make a case about being on the side of the strivers – and nor was any effort made to assure people about public services. This was a huge error.

3) Whilst Labour did an admiral job at energising young voters (a key demographic for them), No.10 arrived at the odd view that it would be wise to take a swipe at pensioners (a key base for them).

4) If the polling numbers are to be believed, Theresa May became less popular the more people saw of her. Corbyn, by contrast, exceeded expectations as the bar was initially set so low and consequently he grew more popular the more people saw of him.

5) The national campaign became almost entirely negative. Whilst there is nothing wrong with pointing out your opponents’ flaws, you still have to devote the vast majority of air time to giving people compelling reasons as to why they should vote for you.

 


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The views expressed in this article are that of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Conservatives for Liberty